Mobility

September 2017

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56 Mobility | September 2017 There's not a country in the world that has a surefi re method of educating a child. Some countries, however, do better at giving a child the opportunity to learn. Here's a look at some of the world's education systems. The U.S.—by a wide margin—leads the world in the number and quality of universities and colleges. According to a 2017 survey, the U.S. claimed 61 spots in a list of the top 100 universities across the globe. The runner-up was the U.K., with nine. In fact, there were just eight countries, including the U.S., that had more than one. Of the world's top 5,000 universities, the U.S. claimed 1,128 spots. Rounding out the top fi ve were Japan with 264, Brazil with 180, Germany with 147, and the U.K. with 142. Source: webometrics.info Finland, which consistently ranks at the top of studies comparing the world's education systems, draws the attention of school offi cials from around the world. How do they do it? Here are just a few of the Finnish school system's features that might set it apart: It uses the same curriculum for all students; there are no classes for gifted students; there is little standardized testing; kids do not start school until age 7; it has a comprehensive preschool program that focuses on "self-refl ection" and socializing, not academics; and no grades are handed out until high school. Source: greatschools.org The U.S. in 2010 spent almost $12,000 per student for elementary and secondary education, nearly 40 percent more than the worldwide average, according to a study conducted by the OECD. Some countries, however, including Switzerland, Norway, and Luxembourg, outspent the U.S. Luxembourg, for example, spent $19,050 per student. Source: investopedia.com A billionaire businessman in Peru started his own line of schools, called Innova, in 2011, mixing tech-heavy online learning, guided lessons, and group work. Helping out was the global design fi rm IDEO, which wanted the school settings to be both modular and adaptable to different locations. The schools, open to pupils in kindergarten to 11th grade, now number 29 and seem to be doing a good job: In 2013, 61 percent of Innova second-graders reached profi ciency in Peru's federal math exams; the national average was 17 percent. Source: businessinsider.com Finland, which consistently ranks at the top of studies comparing the world's Finland, which consistently ranks at the top of studies comparing the world's education systems, draws the attention of school offi cials from around the education systems, draws the attention of school offi cials from around the world. How do they do it? Here are just a few of the Finnish school system's world. How do they do it? Here are just a few of the Finnish school system's features that might set it apart: It uses the same curriculum for all students; features that might set it apart: It uses the same curriculum for all students; there are no classes for gifted students; there is little standardized testing; there are no classes for gifted students; there is little standardized testing; kids do not start school until age 7; it has a comprehensive preschool program kids do not start school until age 7; it has a comprehensive preschool program that focuses on "self-refl ection" and socializing, not academics; and no grades that focuses on "self-refl ection" and socializing, not academics; and no grades according to a study conducted by the OECD. Some countries, however, according to a study conducted by the OECD. Some countries, however, A billionaire businessman in Peru started his own line of schools, called A billionaire businessman in Peru started his own line of schools, called Innova, in 2011, mixing tech-heavy online learning, guided lessons, and group Innova, in 2011, mixing tech-heavy online learning, guided lessons, and group work. Helping out was the global design fi rm IDEO, which wanted the school work. Helping out was the global design fi rm IDEO, which wanted the school settings to be both modular and adaptable to different locations. The schools, settings to be both modular and adaptable to different locations. The schools,

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