Mobility

February 2017

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50 Mobility | February 2017 Companies not only supply athletes and entertainers with free stuff, they also pay a lot of money in sponsorships to get their corporate logos associated with events, teams, and celebrities that attract potential consumers' eyes. Slazenger, the British sporting goods company, and the tennis tournament known as The Championships— Wimbledon—have the longest partnership in sports history. The company has supplied tennis balls to the All England Lawn Tennis Club since 1902. In 2016, the company provided 52,000 balls, each of which was tested for weight, bounce, and compression. Source: wimbledon.com Sneaker companies not only supply basketball players with free sneakers, but they also line the athletes' pockets with a lot of cash. And, somewhat surprisingly, the man with the most lucrative contract hasn't played competitive basketball for more than a decade. In 2014, Michael Jordan's brand of sneaker had eight times the sales of the signature shoe worn by LeBron James, the active National Basketball Association player with the richest sneaker contract. Jordan's Nike shoe sales that year amounted to a staggering $2.6 billion. Jordan was paid about $100 million to lend his name to the Nike brand and other partners. Source: forbes.com If you've ever seen Elton John in concert, it's almost certain he was playing a Yamaha piano, which has long supplied the superstar with his gear. The company has set up the musician with four piano systems for touring, and it includes most of the electronic instruments and sound gear that he and his band need. A Yamaha representative has called "Piano A," the fi rst of John's 9-foot concert grands, "probably the most played, most traveled piano on the planet." Source: yamaha.com Corporate spending for sponsorships of music venues, tours, and festivals continues to rise. Companies spent $1.34 billion in 2014, a 4.4 percent increase from the previous year. The Coca-Cola Co. led the way, locking up 27 percent of partnership agreements with various musical ventures. Anheuser- Busch InBev SA, however, dominated music festivals, as the beer company sold its suds at 31 percent of the noteworthy gatherings. Source: sponsorship.com Omega, the Swiss watch company, has supplied the Olympic Games with its skills since 1932, when it fi rst became the sporting event's offi cial timekeeper. A single watchmaker, armed with 30 split-second chronographs, showed up in Los Angeles that year. For the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro, a team of timekeeping professionals came equipped with 450 tons of equipment to make sure Omega got it right. Source: omegawatches.com anyamuse / Shutterstock.com anyamuse / Shutterstock.com Yamaha piano, which has long supplied the superstar with his gear. The company has set up the musician with four piano systems for touring, and it includes most of the electronic instruments and sound gear that he and his band need. A Yamaha representative has called "Piano A," the fi rst of John's 9-foot concert LunaseeStudios / Shutterstock.com

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