Mobility

June 2016

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58 Mobility | June 2016 With benefi ts matching or even outranking salary in the list of job seekers' highest considerations, companies are increasingly exploring what perks will help them attract and retain top talent. Here's a look at some of the different approaches. Employers have noticed that technology is making it easier and more convenient for their workers to improve their health and participate in wellness programs. Telemedicine—technologies that make it possible to provide clinical health care at a distance—is an especially booming area, though not without controversy around privacy issues. A survey by the National Business Group on Health estimates that this year 74 percent of large employers will offer telemedicine services, compared to just 48 percent in 2015. Source: www.benefi tfocus.com According to a 2014 study, the manufacturing sector has the highest percentage of companies offering its employees basic benefi ts, which include major medical coverage, dental insurance, life insurance, vision insurance, and disability insurance. Following manufacturing are the health care sector, education, and fi nancial services industries, with retail coming in last. Source: www.cnbc.com Iceland has one of the highest rates of working moms in the world— about 85 percent of women with children under 15 work. No wonder. The country, which has had paternity leave since the 1970s, last year passed what it calls the 5-2-5 policy, which entitles the mother to fi ve months leave, the father to fi ve months leave, and they can divide two more months between themselves, however they choose. They have up to two years to use the time off, and they're paid 80 percent of their wages. Source: money.cnn.com Google has long been touted as the best place to work if you're in it for the benefi ts, but the evidence is there that the company is truly looking out for its employees and their families. Consider: The spouse of a deceased employee gets half of their annual salary, plus stock benefi ts, for 10 years; children receive $1,000 a month until they turn 19. Source: www.eremedia.com photogearch / Shutterstock.com Employers have noticed that technology is making it easier and more convenient for their workers to improve their health and participate in wellness programs. Telemedicine—technologies that make it possible to provide clinical health care at a distance—is an especially booming area, though not without controversy around privacy issues. A survey by the National Business Group on Health estimates that this year 74 percent of large employers will offer Iceland has one of the highest rates of working moms in the world— about 85 percent of women with children under 15 work. No wonder. The country, which has had paternity leave since the 1970s, last year passed what it calls the 5-2-5 policy, which entitles the mother to fi ve months leave, the father to fi ve months leave, and they can divide two more months between themselves, however they choose. They have up to two years to use the time off, and they're paid 80 percent of their wages. With benefi ts matching or even outranking salary in the list of job seekers' highest considerations, companies are increasingly exploring what perks will help them attract and retain top talent. Here's a look at some of the different approaches.

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